01 May Second of Feng Shui NAQ’s: Never Asked Questions

Young Man Moving Sofa Into New HomeIn my prior article, I discussed the first Feng Shui NAQ (question that is never asked but should be) which was Do you want to see my space before. . . .?”    I received emails from people who still expressed concern about having a consultant come in when they are dealing with large amounts of clutter.  I will reiterate:  Bring a consultant in before you start your project.  They do not judge.  They will help you prioritize.   

The second Feng Shui NAQ arose as a result of my listening to people ask what more they can do to alleviate their painful issue.  They have painted their Wealth area purple, hung a wind-chime, put in a fountain, buried coins in the yard, gotten rid of dried flowers.  The question that is never asked is:   Am I doing too much?  If you feel compelled to ask this question, then the answer is probably “yes.”

Read what to do here. . . . .

Books and free online advice are readily available.  With all this access to information, some people feel they need to cover their bases—more is better, and besides, what can it hurt?  Actually, being an over-achieving Feng Shui enthusiast can indeed cause problems.  Here’s the reason:  Placed with careful intention and clarity, a physical item that represents a personal intention is set in a specific place to help bring about that goal. The messages get blurred when there is an abundance of intentions trying to be “heard.”  They don’t team up to make a stronger plea for a particular change.  Instead, conflict and confusion results in bringing about little if any positive movement toward the goal.

If you think you’ve done too much, then respectfully remove one adjustment at a time until you have the basic message spelled out concisely and clearly.  If you’re working on Wealth, then one or two adjustments should be adequate.  If you’re working on a serious Health issue, you may incorporate three adjustments.  However, I’ve seen and experienced myself some beautiful results with just one item.  This minimal approach requires a commitment to trust and patience, belief and timing.  Hanging more things won’t make it happen quicker or bigger—it may, in fact, backfire.

Next time:  The Third Feng Shui NAQ