21 Mar Does a TV in the Hospital Room Help or Hurt the Patient’s Healing?

Working as a Feng Shui consultant in various hospitals over the years, I have been cognizant that there are specific life-critical systems in place near each hospital bed.  In an emergency, an oxygen supply, medical ventilators, monitoring capabilities are all crucial to helping people heal.

Along with all that, the patient is also influenced by the presence of a television.  Typically mounted on the wall, the TV looms over the patient waiting for the chance to entertain or inform.  A remote allows the patient to decide what to watch on their television and when.

But is this a good idea?

In Feng Shui, television sets are a modern invention that didn’t have to be taken into consideration a few hundred years ago.  In homes, I suggest that a television be placed in an armoire of entertainment center where doors can close off its influence.

And now that a TV in a hospital room is expected, they require attention in terms of their healing impact.

Here are some “Pros” and “Cons” to the TV question based on a Feng Shui approach:

Cons:

  • They have a strong presence even if they aren’t broadcasting. When the TV is off, the screen is dark creating a black hole in the room which pulls energy from the patient.
  • They are typically mounted near the ceiling. I understand this from the standpoint of cleaning and countertop space, but looking “up” at a TV puts the patient in an inferior position.
  • They emit an electromagnetic field which can impede a patient’s recovery.
  • They’re scientifically linked to other negative effects when someone watches television for long periods of time—-lack of exercise, obesity, depression, etc.

Pros:

  • Watching television can certainly be a distraction but in doing so, will take the patient’s mind off their discomfort, even if for a short period of time.
  • Many hospitals now have “healing” TV programs available to patients—-soft music, scenes of nature, inspiring quotes—-which is clearly helpful to someone who needs to get better.
  • They can bring people together as they enjoy a special program or series as a group.
  • They can help a patient pass the time.

I am sure televisions will not be removed from hospital rooms any time soon.  So here are my two suggestions to make sure they are a healing tool and not just an energy drain.

  • First, lower them (even slightly) so the interaction between patient and TV is on a more equal level.
  • Second, have a way to cover the TV when it’s not in use. A shutter system is the simplest way to do this—-they’re easy to keep clean and easy to open and close.

Feng Shui subscribes to the concept of flow and movement and everything in moderation—-even watching television from a hospital bed.